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big men cry review
(by kim alexander)
january 3 1999

big men cry is a rich and highly diverse release in terms of mastering, programming and sounds respectively. a few tracks bring out futuristic and quite exotic mental images as in starstation earth, an ambient experimental work with deep bass drones and reverberating effects that move below key loops and symphonic harmony. drunk as a monk is yet another experimental track with chanting, effects that increase in timbre to apex with a marchlike beat of drums. villean pipes (aidan o'brien), bring the track down in pace and up in aural awareness with more drum and bass. this could be scorn meets the orb i think! very tasty track!

one can hear the eastern influences in celestine, and saxophones by dick parry, soprano sax by matt jenkins, a male voice calls to stars over an upheaval of electronica then tames down into keys and drums where the saxs take their turn and enhance this slower section of the track with mellower percussion and bass....simply beautiful. the release is not without sounds of nature. gates does windows (what a great title eh?), is an interesting track starting off with a man whistling, birds chirping and transform into increasing rumbling with spindly whispering sounds of what could be energy moving through circuits if one could hear it. the piece moves into a wonderful ambient orchestral voice eerily expressing the electro-arch angel of impending y2k doom! yikes! astounding track. has gates heard this yet?

toby marks has a number of releases out over the years. if you haven't heard any of his work, pick up a disk or two. his time spent traveling certainly shows up in his music. his sense of universal harmony is another quality that is striking in his compositions and seems to give him the ability to forge out more unique work on a regular basis.

  credits

reproduced without permission from last sigh. to be used for private and research use only. original article is here.

copyright 1999-2002 gavin stok. all rights reserved